DIY Outdoor Fireplace Built for Cheap

CAN I BUILD MY OWN DIY OUTDOOR FIREPLACE?

DIY outdoor fireplace
Gorgeous light colored veneer and lighting make this a very cool DIY fireplace.

If you’ve gotten as far as thinking you want an outdoor backyard fireplace, then the next obvious thought should be on the construction method.  To lay it out as simply as possible, either you build it yourself or a contractor builds it for you.  And I’m not talking about a prefabricated fireplace where you stack a few pieces and have a fire an hour later.  I’m talking about a permanent cinderblock structure with all the amenities such as seating, shelving, lighting, veneer, firewood storage, etc…  Frankly a DIY outdoor fireplace can be built for cheap.

 

Realistic Contractor Concerns

DIY douglas outdoor fireplace decor
Great DIY corner designed fireplace all decorated and ready for a party.

When you elect to have someone else build your fireplace, you will pay for two specific things.  They are materials and labor, the latter of which will be most of your cost.  Is it easier to have someone else sweat while lifting block and splattering mortar?  Absolutely, but you must then step back and look at the alternative.  You!  Have you given much thought to building your own fireplace?  If the answer is no or even maybe, let me give you some things to mull over.  Just one of them may sway you or the entire list may persuade you that a DIY project may be the way to go.

First off, let’s look at the project as a whole.  Building on a large scale with construction plans can be very enjoyable and rewarding.  Think of it as stepping out on a new adventure with a lot of the guesswork taken out because of the plans you hold in your hand.

Some of us have a small perfectionist attitude making it difficult to sit back and watch someone build something for us, knowing we would do it differently.  I want to build to my taste; with my ideas in mind.  Contractors, many times, provide building crews that are only interested in getting done in order to move on to the next project.  In the end, it’s all about cash flow.  Do they care about the final look of something they may never see again, but that you will have to look at everyday for quite some time?  Maybe, however, I prefer complete control of my projects and how they’re built. That’s why I love DIY and that’s why I always try to persuade others to jump on the DIY train.  It’s a fun train.

It may seem small, but you also need to consider whether you will want contractor building crews in your backyard all day for the duration of your project.  They always seem to show up too early or not at all.  Then there’s the problem with the mess that is always left each day.

Think About a DIY Project

Pima DIY outdoor fireplace LG Green Egg kitchen grill
DIY Pima II fireplace with a great outdoor kitchen attached.

When you build yourself, you control the pace of the project.  Some DIY warriors can complete a fireplace project in as few as 9-10 days while still holding down a job.  Others will spend a few weeks to construct their fireplace working only a couple hours here and there.  When you build, it’s up to you how you structure your timeline.

If the previous reasons haven’t convinced you to build your own fireplace then think about the money you could save by not soliciting the services of a contractor.  As mentioned before, most of your cost with a contractor will be for labor.  It is estimated that you can take the total cost of your materials and multiply it by 5-6 to give you an approximate labor cost.  With this example, if you were to spend a total of $1,000 for materials, then the labor could cost as much as $5,000-$6,000, for a grand total of $6,000-$7,000 for a completed fireplace.  That’s expensive!

Not only are you paying for labor, but at times the contractor will make money on materials too. In other words, they will charge you more for each block than what it will cost for you to go to your own home improvement store to buy them.  You’ll only know that though if they provide you with an itemized list of materials and labor broken down.

Nothing is set in stone with how fireplaces have to be built, or even how much you have to pay.  The truth is, however, that you will save money if you step out on faith and build your own outdoor fireplace.  Think about how you’ll feel when you finish your own DIY outdoor fireplace project, knowing that you could have spent so much more.

Look No Further Than Backyard Flare

If you’re looking for assistance in the form of DIY outdoor fireplace construction plans, please visit Backyard Flare, LLC at www.backyardflare.com.  We have many fireplace designs that we’re sure would look great in your outdoor living space.  We would love the opportunity to work with you to make your backyard the talk of the neighborhood.  We’ll give you the knowledge needed and be there for you along the way.  Thank you for reading and we hope to hear from you.

As we always say …happy building.

Please follow us on Instagram and Facebook, as we have lots of cool DIY outdoor fireplace photos and videos added almost every day.  Contact Dan with any questions.

Dan Heston
Backyard Flare, LLC
Tucson, Arizona
dan@backyardflare.com
www.backyardflare.com
www.diyoutdoorfireplaces.com
520-269-9740

Fireplace Building Tools

Tools for DIY Construction

DIY fireplaces vs contractor built fireplaces – which one would I choose?  You can probably guess that one based on the URL of this website.  I always gravitate toward trying to build everything myself and because of this I rely on a few specific fireplace building tools.

Picture of DIY outdoor fireplace built using a Backyard Flare construction plan.
Beautiful outdoor living space

I believe that most people have what it takes to build their own outdoor fireplace.  When you think about the cost savings alone, you will understand that it just makes sense.  If you can lift 30 pounds repeatedly and occasionally a bag of mortar, then you can do it so if you choose this route you’ll need a few different tools to start construction.

Fireplace Building Tools

This is not a comprehensive list of tools needed but it’ll definitely get you going.  A wheelbarrow, hose, and hoe for mixing the mortar, as well as a trowel for laying the block are helpful items.  You’ll need a level, preferably about a 4-footer and a measuring tape.  The wheelbarrow and hoe will be to mix your concrete and mortar.  There are many different sizes and shapes of trowels, and it will become apparent which one you prefer once you use a couple different ones.  You’ll need one that is big enough to transfer and apply the mortar but not so big that you feel as if it’s inhibiting your ability to work cleanly without dropping mortar everywhere.

Block Cutting

If blocks will be cut, you will need some type of saw with a diamond blade.  I have used a circular saw as well as a 10” grinder.  The grinder is by far my go to method for block cutting as it is very easy to control.  This cutting process is best done dry, but make sure to use eye protection as small pieces of concrete from the block will be flying around.

When you cut blocks, make sure to account for a mortar gap.  You will want it to be around 3/8”.  If it is slightly smaller or even larger than 3/8” you don’t have to worry.  Mortar will make up for any imperfections.

When you have a design to follow or a plan that will guide you along the way, you will be ready to start laying block.  Good luck with your construction and happy building.  We always welcome questions and additional information to follow to our other readers.